In Deed and In Truth

thoughts from a Christian

Lust of the Flesh

Since there’s been an added interest in the topic of sex and carnal desires, I figured it was high time to write another blog post about that which people can relate to and that which some cannot seem to get enough.  Here is the first of the three descriptions of the “things of this world.”

LUST OF THE FLESH

It is important that each and everyone of us takes a look at our own personal daily lives and determine what takes precedence in our lives.  What do we keep in front of our eyes?  What do we focus our minds on?  What are our hearts filled with?  Is it with the things of God or the things of this world?

Once we determine what takes priority in our lives we must make a decision.  Do we stay the course or do we change direction?  If we’ve remained obedient to the things of God then we are on the right track.  But if we’ve come to the revelation that our lives are filled more with the things of this world, what must we do then?  It is then that we must turn away from the things that are destructive and turn back to God.  The question we then ask ourselves is, “what are we turning away from?”

I. The Lust of the Flesh

1 John 2:16- “For all that is in the world, the lust of the flesh, the lust of the eyes and the pride of life, is not of the Father but is of the world.”

I was once enlightened to an important and critical fact.  We in this world must learn to transform our love for sin into our love for God.  We must learn to love sin less and love God more.  We must exchange our love for sin for the love of God.  This is of course very difficult for many of us.  We find gratification with sin.  We find fulfillment.  We feel as if we are whole by committing the sins that we commit.  When we try and exchange our sin for God, that fulfillment may not be as tangible.  We try to stay satisfied with God, but it’s difficult because God isn’t as visible or tangible as the sin we’ve been holding to.

Then eventually we feel empty.  We need to be filled.  God is absent.  We don’t feel him.  But we sure do know the feeling we get when we commit a sin.  We remember how good it felt.  We remember how it satisfied our longings.  We could not wait for God to fill the void in our hearts.  It’s much more easily satisfied by sin.

But we remember what Christ told the Samaritan woman at the well.  He who drinks of the water of this well will thirst again but he who drinks of the water that I give him will never thirst.  We may satisfy our cravings temporarily by committing the sins that we know make us feel good, but it is a short term gratification.  We must turn away from these things and turn to God.

We are fortunate enough that the apostle John introduced us to the things that we should be wary of.  In the introduction, we asked ourselves, what are the things that we are supposed to turn from?  Sin, sure.  But more specifically John gives us three weapons the enemy uses that we must look out for.

The first is the lust of the flesh.  The Greek word for “lust” is epithumia.  It speaks of “a desire, a craving, a longing, a desire for what is forbidden.”[1] This desire is for the flesh.  The Greek word for “”flesh” is sarx.  It “denotes mere human nature, the earthly nature of man apart from divine influence and therefore prone to sin and opposed to God.”[2] In simpler terms, when talking of the lust of the flesh, it talks of the humanly desires.  “The lust of the flesh is, subjectively, the humour and appetite of indulging fleshly pleasures; and objectively, all those things that excite and inflame the pleasures of the flesh.”[3]

This is the nature of man.  Fleshly, carnal obsession and desires constitute the makeup of mankind.  As sin permeates throughout our entire being, we are characterized by the desire to fulfill the desires of our flesh.  It is our wanting, our longing, to indulge in pleasures of the earthly kind.  Do we not find ourselves desiring to indulge in the appetites of that which ultimately corrupts our character, our integrity, our morality and thwarts any progress of our relationship with God?

Sensual and impure desires overtake that which we know is correct and moral.  This world allows these desires to be accessible, attainable, and acceptable.  They are lusts that are freely given.  They are desires sought after by the majority of this world that if one desires not to pursue, they are of the minority, are looked down upon, spat upon, and called intolerant.

And yet, they are still desires that we justify.  We crave it.  We desire it.  We need it.  I’m suffering and it brings me temporary gratification.  The flesh is good at the moment my lust is being satisfied.  I only consider what is immediately in front of me.  And what is in front of me is lust.  Lust for violence, for gore, for sex, for men, for women, for alcohol, for drugs, for hate, for wrath, for envy, for jealousy, and uncleanness.  For everything discussed in Galatians 5:19.  There are nearly twice as many works of the flesh than there are works of the Spirit.  We must be wary of what takes precedence in our lives.

We discussed earlier that we must decide to not fill our hearts with the things of this world, but rather to turn away from those things and fill our hearts with the things of God.  This is necessary because we remind ourselves that to be carnally minded is death, but to be spiritually mind is life and peace.

We must consider our own lives and decide if the lust of the flesh supersedes our love for God.  Are we overridden with sensual impure thoughts?  Worse yet, are we overridden with sensual impure actions?  Do we seek immediate gratification even at the expense of our soul?

With each temptation we succumb to we make a bold statement that we would rather live for the lust of our flesh than for the glory of God.  We’ve heard so many times to repent and to turn away but never the specific answer of what to turn away from.  With conviction we know that which we must steer clear of.  The lust of the flesh keeps us far away from God.

(Picture taken from http://pics.livejournal.com/ric14u/pic/0002h9qk/s320x240)


[1] Blueletterbible.com

[2] Ibid

[3] Matthew Henry’s Commentary

March 1, 2011 - Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

3 Comments »

  1. Can I ask a question? Is pre-marital sex sin?

    Thanks

    Comment by gordon | May 29, 2012 | Reply

  2. Is pre-marital sex sin even if you deeply love each other and would marry afterwards?

    Comment by gordon | May 30, 2012 | Reply

    • Yes. Any sex, outside of the divine institute of marriage as how God intended, whether pre-marital, adultery, bestiality, homosexuality, etc.. is a sin. Even the justification of planning to be married afterwards is unacceptable to the standards that God has set for sex. People do many things because they are “deeply in love.” Many of it not right. We’re trying to justify our actions before a righteous God. If you know someone who is engaged in pre-marital sex, (justifying it’s ok because they’re in love) and is a believer in Jesus Christ, kindly inform them, in all gentleness and compassion without condemnation it’s wrong. Begin the process of reconciliation and restoration. We’re all sinners. But the beauty of Christ is that our sins no longer condemn us to eternal life in hell, but by grace we are saved through faith in Jesus Christ.

      fight the good fight my friend.

      Comment by jlacanilao | May 31, 2012 | Reply


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