In Deed and In Truth

thoughts from a Christian

Social Change

So many groups today strive to change the world, hoping to affect and influence their respective societies by inundating them with information and proactive propaganda, activities and events, rallies to publicly display their support or opposition against their personal axiological beliefs.  This is their aim.  This is their purpose.  And this is their prerogative.

Eventually, the responsibility and burden of social change also falls upon the church.  Various denominations focus ministries and money toward social change for the betterment of society.  (The definition of “betterment” is thoroughly subjective, according to the one arguing for it).  People are always striving to change societal perceptions, values, and priorities.  They reach out to the law makers, the judges, the politicians, the church leaders, the business minded and wealthy, with hopes of stirring change in these highly influential people that will one day cause a chain reaction, bringing attention to the evils (or good) that plague mankind.

Here’s where the change needs to be made.  If one truly wants to make a change in the world, in society, in a school, in their church, one must understand that education is an agent for social change.  The problem is that we’re focusing our attention on educating the wrong demographic.

In order to change the world, change society, or change our church, it’s not so much about educating those who are in positions of leadership, authority, and influence.  It’s about educating those who will be.

It’s about educating our youth.

And it’s not just about educating our youth, but providing our youth with a Christian education, understanding that the Bible must be the integration point for their entire knowledge.  Christian education is to provide a protected atmosphere for the young where this transmission can take place and where Christian values may be imparted to the young in their formative years through formal curriculum and through more informal aspects of the educational contexts such as peer group or extra-curricular activities.[1]

These are the minds that must be introduced to sound, conservative Biblical principles, principles that they will base their epistemology upon, principles that will guide and direct their lives.  It is these principles that will produce a strong hold against the things of this world that will inevitably corrupt a young mind bound for positions of authority.  If we can protect the values of our youth, they will endure society, firm in their Biblical and Christological conviction, and will carry that same conviction into the authoritative roles that they will one day occupy.

It’s not about trying to change the mind of our leaders today.  It’s about developing the minds of the leaders of tomorrow.

If you want to change society, take your focus off the rallies, the flyers, letters to the politicians, the stand-ins, the protests, the t-shirts, the websites, and the blogs.  Instead, make the 20 year investment by teaching Biblical principles to our children today, from the moment they can determine their axiological beliefs.  And when they are old, when they become our future politicians, future business entrepreneurs, future presidents, and future church leaders, we can trust the Lord that they will not depart from it.

(Picture taken from http://cheritasmith.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/08/I-want-change.jpg)


[1] Philosophical Foundations of Christian Education, The Social Function of Christian Education pg. 79

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March 9, 2011 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment